NALOXONE DISPENSING IN KANSAS

Pharmacists are the key to increasing naloxone access in communities. The state of Kansas allows pharmacists to dispense naloxone at their discretion to patients, family members and bystanders, law enforcement and EMS agencies, and school nurses, pursuant to a statewide protocol.

The statewide protocol to dispense naloxone is pharmacist-specific, not pharmacy-specific.

TRENDS IN NALOXONE DISPENSING

Research from the CDC shows a 106% increase in naloxone dispensing from 2017 to 2018, but there are barriers to access, including rural locations and out-of-pocket costs.

Chart showing 1 nasal spray and 69 pill bottles

One naloxone prescription was dispensed for every 69 high-dose opioid prescriptions nationally in 2018.

Source: CDC

Graph showing 1 in 4 people

One in four Kansas pharmacists has signed the naloxone protocol and can dispense pursuant to a statewide protocol.

Source: Kansas Board of Pharmacy

BECOME A NALOXONE DISPENSER

To become a naloxone dispenser in the state of Kansas:

  1. Read KAR 68-7-23, the statute that established the naloxone protocol.
  2. Download, review and sign the official pre-signed statewide protocol.
  3. Submit the protocol to the Board of Pharmacy within 5 days of signing.

You may also use a blank version of the protocol and work with another authorizing physician. Please make sure the last page is signed by both an authorizing physician and pharmacist.

FIND NALOXONE NEAR YOU

This map includes all pharmacies in the state of Kansas with a staff pharmacist who has signed the statewide naloxone protocol. If you believe your pharmacy should be listed on the map, submit your pharmacist's signed naloxone protocol to be included.

TALK TO PATIENTS ABOUT NALOXONE

It's important to talk to both patients and caregivers about the benefits of naloxone. Start with these tips:

  • Most opioid overdoses are accidental. Naloxone reverses the effects of an opioid overdose and can save a life, just like a seatbelt or fire extinguisher.
  • Ask caregivers if they feel comfortable administering naloxone to a friend or loved one in the event of an opioid overdose.
  • Offer naloxone training for those caregivers to increase their confidence and comfort level.
  • Emphasize that naloxone does not replace emergency services. If using naloxone during an opioid overdose, always call 911 first.
  • Review the signs and symptoms of opioid overdose, including the potential for life-threatening reactions that make breathing slow down or stop.
  • Tell patients and caregivers about what to expect after giving someone naloxone.

Source: Adapted from Rhode Island Department of Health

NALOXONE DISPENSING GUIDELINES

The Kansas Pharmacy Foundation offers Naloxone Dispensing continuing education hours. Always check the current list of approved Pharmacist CE courses if you are seeking continuing education hours.

PHARMACIST DISCRETION

Pharmacists have the ultimate discretion to participate in this program, and the discretion to choose whether to dispense to each patient or bystander.

DISPENSING A VALID PRESCRIPTION

Pharmacists do not need to sign the naloxone protocol in order to dispense valid naloxone prescriptions. You may continue to do that in accordance with normal pharmacy practice standards.

LIMITS TO DISPENSING

There is no legal limit to how much naloxone can be dispensed to one person. A pharmacist may exercise their discretion in limiting dispensing.

PHARMACIST DOCUMENTATION

A signed copy of the protocol should be retained on paper or electronically in each location that a pharmacist dispenses naloxone, and must be readily retrievable upon Board of Pharmacy inspection.

NALOXONE TRAINING

There is no additional education or training required for pharmacists to dispense naloxone.

PATIENT COUNSELING

Provide in-person counseling, training and written educational materials appropriate to the dosage dispensed, according to KAR 68-7-23 and outlined in the protocol.

PROTOCOL EXPIRATION

The naloxone protocol does not expire. If the Board of Pharmacy modifies it, all pharmacists will be notified. If a pharmacist wants to discontinue dispensing naloxone without a prescription, the pharmacist should notify the Board of Pharmacy.

LIABILITY FOR DISPENSING

Any pharmacist who, in good faith and with reasonable care, prescribes or dispenses an emergency opioid antagonist without a prescription shall not, by an act or omission, be subject to civil liability, criminal prosecution or any disciplinary or other adverse action by the Board of Pharmacy arising from the pharmacist dispensing the emergency opioid antagonist. Additionally, any bystander (including a pharmacist) who, in good faith and with reasonable care, administers an emergency opioid antagonist to a person experiencing a suspected opioid overdose shall not, by an act or omission, be subject to civil liability or criminal prosecution, unless personal injury results from the gross negligence or willful or wanton misconduct in the administration of the emergency opioid antagonist.